(dramatic music) (gun firing) (gun firing) (pot shattering) (angry growling) (wheels screeching) (upbeat music) – A scamp is someone who
is mischievous or roguish in a likable way. This week, Crypt TV premieres “Scamp”, and introduces the titular,
furry, little creature to their monster universe. With that in mind, I thought
I’d introduce you guys to a furry little creature of my own, Sam. Sam will take it from here. OK, she doesn’t talk,
but I’ll cover that part. Furry beasts started in horror movies with 1913’s “The Werewolf”, considered to be the first
lycanthrope-based film, but it would take 28 years
before Lon Chaney Jr. would get covered in yak
hair to play Larry Talbot in “The Wolf Man”. Jack Pierce’s now iconic
monster makeup design was actually created six years earlier for “Werewolf of London”,
but the star of that film, Henry Hull, refused to wear it because he wanted audiences
to recognize his face, which was the right call, since no one remembers what
the wolf man looks like, but everyone knows Henry Hull. Chaney’s wolf man would become one of the genre’s early
icons and define the werewolf for years to come, but all that said, werewolves aren’t small or
what you would call scamp-like. Really, it would take until the 80s before animatronic innovations would give use the very niche subgenre that Crypt TV “Scamp” lands in. It was really “Gremlins” that launched this particular kind of creature feature. The Joe Dante directed film introduces us to mogwai, magical,
little, furry creatures who multiply when they get wet and turn into gremlins when
they’re fed after midnight. The movie was a huge success and spawned a pile of
knockoffs, like “Critters”. You could argue that
since it had more sequels and star power that “Critters” was a more successful
franchise than “Gremlins”, but that would be a dumb thing to say. “Critters” director Stephen
Herek would refute claims that the film was trying
to knockoff Gremlins, and it was written first
and all that, but come on. The critters were hedgehog-like aliens on the run from
intergalactic bounty hunters. Originally, four movies
were made from 1986 to 1992, but the series was revived with the new film “Critters Attack” and a television series,
“Critters: A New Binge”, which both premiered this year. “Munchies” also did its best to capitalize on the popularity of “Gremlins”. Produced by Roger Corman, who had helped “Gremlins”
director Joe Dante get his start in the business, “Munchies” was a little more
upfront about their intentions. Directed by Tina Hirsch who, like Dante, had started as an editor for Corman, the film would also launch a franchise, but the follow-ups “Munchie”
and “Munchie Strikes Back” would have little to
do with the first film and be more family-oriented. Along with ghoulies, trolls,
hobgoblins, and leprechauns, we also saw a rise in scamps
like evil dolls and puppets, but tiny terrors would kind
of peter out over the 90s. However, the comeback has
been brewing for a while. Chucky never really went that far, and with the success of “Annabelle”, killer dolls are officially back. Guillermo del Toro produced the remake of 1973’s “Don’t Be Afraid of the Dark” featuring some terrifying fairies. Corin Hardy also explored
the dark side of fairy lore with “The Hallow”, and
Mike Dougherty’s “Krampus” brought a myriad of minions who fit within what we’ll call scamp horror. The gingerbread men and evil teddy bears were certainly what we’d call roguish. Now, we’ve got critters
making their comeback, and there’s even new gremlins on the way with the prequel series
“Gremlins: Secrets of the Mogwai” getting a ten episode order from HBO Max, which sets the stage for “Scamp”. Look for “Scamp”
premiering later this month right here on Crypt TV. So, who’s your favorite scamp? Is there a little, furry
creature I forgot to mention? Let us know in the comments, and remember, Fright Hype and Crypt TV
are all over the internet. Until next time, keep
the horror on the screen and off the streets. (echos ringing)

Author Since: Mar 11, 2019

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